Comments about robot cleaners “Roombas” from amazon.com

When my robot first arrived, I had not vacuumed for a few weeks, and within 15 minutes its bin was full and filter clogged

We’ve been using this cleaner for a few weeks now, and once you get to know it’s strengths and weaknesses, it is a very useful family addition

Has an ‘obsession’ with certain corners and areas, going over the same area maybe 10 times or more, but other areas it only does once, and sometimes not at all. … for example it obsessively tries to ‘mount’ the foot pedal on my daughter’s drum-kit (Tries for 10 minutes or more)

I love it! I’d promised myself one of these for ages but always thought ‘how extravagant is that?’

The floors look good all the time and last thing after the evening meal, it’s cleaning up again whilst I watch a bit of telly.

the robot gets confused a bit. When it beeps and shows error then simply…empty the dustbin…clean the brush…wipe the sensors and away you go….My little R2D2 likes going under the bed and the settee a lot…hates his docking station...and loves fast hard work….but I wouldn’t recommend leaving him on his own as it’s a bit like having a 6 year old with a heavy duty vacuum round the place

I would be devastated if he were taken away or if he conked out on me…and I’m so glad I decided to buy it.

Then i upgraded to the Karcher RC3000 which has served me well for 5 years but decided to throw itself down the stairs!!

The cats detest our new addition and the children love driving and emptying it. Bonus!

This machine is great. I tend to sit and watch it do all the work which means I get even less housework done.

sometimes get stuck under weird furniture but most of the time just gets on with its job.

This little robot manages to find dust, hairs and dirt even after thoroughly hovering and mopping the floors. Where he gets it from (yes it’s a he and called Marvin by my better half) is unfathomable. I am that impressed and a little skeptical that I may follow him round one day to check he’s not cheating.

had the robot for nearly 2 weeks and used every day so far…emptied him out about 6 or 7 times….absolutely amazing… have not programmed him yet and will do another update after a few months but so far delighted. cant believe how good it actually is.

But if it reverses towards the top of a staircase, then it will simply leap to its death like the apocryphal lemming. The robot doesn’t often go into reverse mode, so chances are it would be fine for several weeks in a room with unguarded downward steps… but eventually it will drive off the edge, so you cannot risk leaving it unattended around open drops

physical distribution networks

The network of things in the next big network. Imagine the air traffic control – new building types and new city infrastructure will be required. Forget those that say this will never happen; it will.

Anti-Gravity Object Modelling

 

MATAERIAL is a innovative project developed through collaborative research between Petr Novikov, Sasa Jokic from the Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IACC) and Joris Laarman Studio.

The method they’ve coined as “Anti Gravity Object Modelling” is a new method of additive manufacturing that gives the flexibility to create naturally flowing 3D curves without the need for support material. Rather than the layering of 2D planes to make up the 3D object this manufacturing process follows the stress lines of the curve and hardens almost immediately from extrusion.

The really impressive part seems to be that the forms can be printed on any surface regardless of its inclination. Without further knowledge of the materials, my first thought would be that with attributes like sticking to a vertical surface and cantilevering off it as shown in the video, it must use some pretty nasty additives.  The process is impressive none the less.

Robot trade fair opens in Japan – video | Technology | theguardian.com

robo

Tokyo’s international robot exhibition (iREX), the world’s largest robot trade fair, showcases the latest innovations in robotic technology on Thursday. The show welcomes a record 334 exhibitors as Japan, home to almost half of the world’s industrial robots, expects the growing industry to expand to £6.2bn. Robots on show include a robotic muscle suit and a waterproof snake-like search and rescue robot

via Robot trade fair opens in Japan – video | Technology | theguardian.com.

A Gizmo That Makes 49 Rubber Duckies Sway in Perfect Harmony

Getting people excited about motors can be a tough. Sure, there are die hard Hemi fans, but the electromechanical motors made by manufacturer Faz Elektrik do little to stir emotions, even as they power huge industrial fans. With an important trade show on the schedule, the Turkish firm knew they needed some way to showcase their relatively boring black boxes, so they turned to British artist David Cranmer for help.

He promptly suggested an unorthodox solution—a programmable matrix of 49 ducks that appear to float gracefully on invisible swells. “I was hoping they wouldn’t think it was too frivolous for a reputable industrial manufacturer,” says Cranmer, “But they went for it right away and sent me a big box of motors.”

 

dux

RoboBee: tiny robotic ‘insect’ flight demonstration – video | Technology | theguardian.com

A tiny robotic ‘insect’, the size of a penny, demonstrates its controlled flight abilities. Developed by engineers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, RoboBee weighs around 80mg and has a wingspan of 3cm. Scientists anticipate the devices will open up a wide range of discoveries and practical innovations, such as pollination, search and rescue, military surveillance and traffic monitoring

via RoboBee: tiny robotic ‘insect’ flight demonstration – video | Technology | theguardian.com.

▶ Introducing WildCat – YouTube

Published on 3 Oct 2013
WildCat is a four-legged robot being developed to run fast on all types of terrain. So far WildCat has run at about 16 mph on flat terrain using bounding and galloping gaits. The video shows WildCat’s best performance so far. WildCat is being developed by Boston Dynamics with funding from DARPA’s M3 program. For more information about WIldCat visit our website at www.BostonDynamics.com.