http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01nx5jv/Start_the_Week_Art_and_Design_with_Antony_Gormley_and_Ron_Arad/

Something to listen to while you work

Start the Week; Art and Design with Antony Gormley, Ron Arad, Christopher Frayling and Sarah Teasley, chaired by Andrew Marr.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01nx5jv/Start_the_Week_Art_and_Design_with_Antony_Gormley_and_Ron_Arad/

something particular in this conversation for each of you….

and this for Toby Shark

STEPHEN MELVILLE LECTURE TOMORROW (thursday 9am 3rd floor student hub)

Guys – we think you should attend tomorrow’s free lecture at 9am in the student hub – Stephen Melville is a structural engineer on the cutting edge of design. Please attend!

Computers run hot so why not harness that heat to warm a building, Swiss researchers say.- swissinfo

pc

Companies often spend large sums cooling network servers, but Swiss scientists have found a way to cut those costs by using computer-generated heat to warm buildings.

Physicists at the Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH) working with IBM have created a liquid-cooled server system that can slash energy bills by as much as half while generating heat with little to no additional carbon emissions.

“Computers are an excellent source of heat that until now has been wasted,” Bruno Michel, an IBM physicist and leader of the project, told swissinfo.ch.

via Computers run hot so why not harness that heat to warm a building, Swiss researchers say.- swissinfo.

Compact and flexible thermal storage – Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology

Compact and flexible thermal storage

Forschung Kompakt, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft,  Jun 01, 2012

Biogas plants, combined heat and power plants don’t just generate electricity, they also produce heat. However, unlike the electricity they yield, the heat generally dissipates unused. A new technology is set to change this: It will allow the heat to be stored lossfree in the smallest of spaces for lengthy periods of time, for use as and when required.

via Compact and flexible thermal storage – Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology.

Colour

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap121007.html

 

Explanation: Are square A and B the same color? They are! To verify this, either run your cursor over the image or click here to see them connected. The above illusion, called the same color illusion, illustrates that purely human observations in science may be ambiguous or inaccurate. Even such a seemingly direct perception as relative color. Similar illusions exist on the sky, such as the size of the Moon near the horizon, or the apparent shapes of astronomical objects. The advent of automated, reproducible, measuring devices such as CCDs have made science in general and astronomy in particular less prone to, but not free of, human-biased illusions.

Must-visit (often) Website MATERIA

About Materia New materials present opportunities for fascinating innovations. Materia stimulates and inspires architects, designers and producers to applythese materials to their designs. The company is a knowledge centre for developments and innovations in materials, and their applications for architecture and design. Materia is familiar with many innovative materials from all over the world, as well having knowledge of their specific characteristics. This knowledge is published worldwide by Materia using various media.

Materia’s aim: to build together with creative professionals on a new vision for the future: Today’s inspirations is tomorrow’s innovation!

http://www.materia.nl/

Book Review – Corporate Fields __Week 3 « HildaChak

Corporate Fields – New Office Environments by the AA DRL is a book on student projects by the AA Design Research Lab. The DRL was founded in 1996 and is one of the most recognised MArch programmes today. The book visits 26 design projects that were completed between October 1997 to January 2001. These projects are a combination of various initialisation, specification and organisation that have arrived into a final research result. They are sorted by pedagogical focus and what it has achieved. All projects explore the process and forms working with the way corporate companies work in the organizational and management aspects. There are also essays by various tutors on a range of subjects relating to office design.

via Book Review – Corporate Fields __Week 3 « HildaChak.

Amazing CAD/3D Model Site

something to check out – http://grabcad.com/Loads of free 3D models and such and a place to upload your own for comment and criticism.

Beijing to become smart city within three years (Wired UK)

Beijing to become smart city within three years

By Sarah Marsh12 October 12

via Beijing to become smart city within three years (Wired UK).

 

Space to Work: Book Review « CW

SPACE TO WORK: BOOK REVIEW

Posted by clarewashington on October 12, 2012 · 1 Comment

 

I have chosen to review ‘Space to Work’, a book written in 2006 by Jeremy Myerson and Philip Ross. The aim of the book is to establish a code of office design for the modern-day knowledge worker to increase productivity.

What is a knowledge worker?

The book starts off by defining what a ‘knowledge worker’ is; those who carry out work based not on performance, but on applying specific knowledge to a profession. Examples the book gives are doctors, lawyers and academics. This work doesn’t need a traditional office layout or design, something that many firms have failed to take note of in recent years. This is true of both the physical structure of the office layout and amenities it offers, as well as the hierarchical structure of the firm.

The four ‘realms’ of knowledge workers

The book looks at 43 separate case studies of offices, split into four realms of knowledge worker. These are the corporate realm, termed ‘Academy’, the professional realm (Guilds), the public realm (Agora) and the private realm (Lodge). These case studies give a good overview of what the book terms ‘new office design’ that could well lead to significant increases in workforce productivity. For this review I have chosen to summarise four case studies; one for each realm, to create an overview of these sections.

more via Space to Work: Book Review « MArch2.

PEG stands for Personal Energy Generator

Extends office space to the wilderness:

http://www.npowerpeg.com/

 

TECH: LED

I’ve often said that LED technology in its recent incarnation is one of the most important things to happen in architecture for 20 years.

Nick Holonyak was sure the LED would replace the incandescent light bulb when he presented it to GE executives 50 years ago. While the incandescent is still king in homes across the nation, the LED has transformed lighting in more ways than Holonyak could have imagined.

From those first dim red diodes to powerful streetlights in major cities, the LED has made its mark on the world.

The Ubiquitous Red LED

The first LEDs were red. This wasn’t an aesthetic choice. LEDs are made by building layers of semiconductor crystals on a wafer. As the layers are added, dopants are added to determine the color of the LED. The tiny wafer is placed into molten liquid and metal contacts and leads are then added. The mixture used in the first LEDs — gallium arsenide phosphide — produces a natural red color. That’s why red became the default color choice for so many indicator lights.

New processes have delivered a rainbow of available LED colors, making them suitable for far more than battery indicators and warning lights. But for the first 10 years of their existence, LEDs were red.

 

read more at: http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/10/the-history-of-led/

Mechanical Brains

http://blog.modernmechanix.com/mechanical-brains-take-over-work-of-ten-office-clerks/